IGNORE ME.
[Spider-Man] represents the everyman, but he represents the underdog and those marginalized who come up against great prejudice which I, as a middle-class straight, white man, don’t really understand so much. And when Stan Lee first wrote and created this character, the outcast was the computer nerd, was the science nerd, was the guy that couldn’t get the girl. Those guys now run the world. So how much of an outcast is that version of Peter Parker anymore? That’s my question.

Part of Andrew Garfield’s response to people being all butthurt when he mentioned a possibility where Spider-Man might not be straight.

Read More: On Andrew Garfield, Stan Lee, And A Bisexual Spider-Man



“When I was a kid, I always felt ashamed of how sensitive I was, emotionally sensitive, physically sensitive — I swear, even my hair was sensitive. I got emotional very easily, and I felt a great deal of shame about that. But when I began acting, I realized I could take that sensitivity and put it to good use.”

“When I was a kid, I always felt ashamed of how sensitive I was, emotionally sensitive, physically sensitive — I swear, even my hair was sensitive. I got emotional very easily, and I felt a great deal of shame about that. But when I began acting, I realized I could take that sensitivity and put it to good use.”